Charles Dickens, Bleak House: Ch. 11

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"Hadn't you better see," says Mr. Tulkinghorn to Krook, "whether he had any papers that may enlighten you?  There will be an inquest, and you will be asked the question.  You can read?"

"No, I can't," returns the old man with a sudden grin.

"Snagsby," says Mr. Tulkinghorn, "look over the room for him.  He will get into some trouble or difficulty otherwise.  Being here, I'll wait if you make haste, and then I can testify on his behalf, if it should ever be necessary, that all was fair and right.  If you will hold the candle for Mr. Snagsby, my friend, he'll soon see whether there is anything to help you."

"In the first place, here's an old portmanteau, sir," says Snagsby.

Ah, to be sure, so there is!  Mr. Tulkinghorn does not appear to have seen it before, though he is standing so close to it, and though there is very little else, heaven knows.

The marine-store merchant holds the light, and the law-stationer conducts the search.  The surgeon leans against the corner of the chimney-piece; Miss Flite peeps and trembles just within the door.  The apt old scholar of the old school, with his dull black breeches tied with ribbons at the knees, his large black waistcoat, his long-sleeved black coat, and his wisp of limp white neckerchief tied in the bow the peerage knows so well, stands in exactly the same place and attitude.

There are some worthless articles of clothing in the old portmanteau; there is a bundle of pawnbrokers' duplicates, those turnpike tickets on the road of poverty; there is a crumpled paper, smelling of opium, on which are scrawled rough memoranda—as, took, such a day, so many grains; took, such another day, so many more—begun some time ago, as if with the intention of being regularly continued, but soon left off.  There are a few dirty scraps of newspapers, all referring to coroners' inquests; there is nothing else.  They search the cupboard and the drawer of the ink-splashed table.  There is not a morsel of an old letter or of any other writing in either.  The young surgeon examines the dress on the law-writer.  A knife and some odd halfpence are all he finds.  Mr. Snagsby's suggestion is the practical suggestion after all, and the beadle must be called in.

So the little crazy lodger goes for the beadle, and the rest come out of the room.  "Don't leave the cat there!" says the surgeon; "that won't do!"  Mr. Krook therefore drives her out before him, and she goes furtively downstairs, winding her lithe tail and licking her lips.

"Good night!" says Mr. Tulkinghorn, and goes home to Allegory and meditation.

By this time the news has got into the court.  Groups of its inhabitants assemble to discuss the thing, and the outposts of the army of observation (principally boys) are pushed forward to Mr. Krook's window, which they closely invest.  A policeman has already walked up to the room, and walked down again to the door, where he stands like a tower, only condescending to see the boys at his base occasionally; but whenever he does see them, they quail and fall back.  Mrs. Perkins, who has not been for some weeks on speaking terms with Mrs. Piper in consequence for an unpleasantness originating in young Perkins' having "fetched" young Piper "a crack," renews her friendly intercourse on this auspicious occasion.  The potboy at the corner, who is a privileged amateur, as possessing official knowledge of life and having to deal with drunken men occasionally, exchanges confidential communications with the policeman and has the appearance of an impregnable youth, unassailable by truncheons and unconfinable in station-houses.  People talk across the court out of window, and bare-headed scouts come hurrying in from Chancery Lane to know what's the matter.  The general feeling seems to be that it's a blessing Mr. Krook warn't made away with first, mingled with a little natural disappointment that he was not.  In the midst of this sensation, the beadle arrives.