Charles Dickens, Bleak House: Ch. 8

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I was glad when we came to the brickmaker's house, though it was one of a cluster of wretched hovels in a brick-field, with pigsties close to the broken windows and miserable little gardens before the doors growing nothing but stagnant pools.  Here and there an old tub was put to catch the droppings of rain-water from a roof, or they were banked up with mud into a little pond like a large dirt-pie.  At the doors and windows some men and women lounged or prowled about, and took little notice of us except to laugh to one another or to say something as we passed about gentlefolks minding their own business and not troubling their heads and muddying their shoes with coming to look after other people's.

Mrs. Pardiggle, leading the way with a great show of moral determination and talking with much volubility about the untidy habits of the people (though I doubted if the best of us could have been tidy in such a place), conducted us into a cottage at the farthest corner, the ground-floor room of which we nearly filled.  Besides ourselves, there were in this damp, offensive room a woman with a black eye, nursing a poor little gasping baby by the fire; a man, all stained with clay and mud and looking very dissipated, lying at full length on the ground, smoking a pipe; a powerful young man fastening a collar on a dog; and a bold girl doing some kind of washing in very dirty water.  They all looked up at us as we came in, and the woman seemed to turn her face towards the fire as if to hide her bruised eye; nobody gave us any welcome.

"Well, my friends," said Mrs. Pardiggle, but her voice had not a friendly sound, I thought; it was much too business-like and systematic.  "How do you do, all of you?  I am here again.  I told you, you couldn't tire me, you know.  I am fond of hard work, and am true to my word."

"There an't," growled the man on the floor, whose head rested on his hand as he stared at us, "any more on you to come in, is there?"

"No, my friend," said Mrs. Pardiggle, seating herself on one stool and knocking down another.  "We are all here."

"Because I thought there warn't enough of you, perhaps?" said the man, with his pipe between his lips as he looked round upon us.

The young man and the girl both laughed.  Two friends of the young man, whom we had attracted to the doorway and who stood there with their hands in their pockets, echoed the laugh noisily.

"You can't tire me, good people," said Mrs. Pardiggle to these latter.  "I enjoy hard work, and the harder you make mine, the better I like it."

"Then make it easy for her!" growled the man upon the floor.  "I wants it done, and over.  I wants a end of these liberties took with my place.  I wants an end of being drawed like a badger.  Now you're a-going to poll-pry and question according to custom—I know what you're a-going to be up to.  Well!  You haven't got no occasion to be up to it.  I'll save you the trouble.  Is my daughter a-washin?  Yes, she IS a-washin.  Look at the water.  Smell it!  That's wot we drinks.  How do you like it, and what do you think of gin instead!  An't my place dirty?  Yes, it is dirty—it's nat'rally dirty, and it's nat'rally onwholesome; and we've had five dirty and onwholesome children, as is all dead infants, and so much the better for them, and for us besides.  Have I read the little book wot you left?  No, I an't read the little book wot you left.  There an't nobody here as knows how to read it; and if there wos, it wouldn't be suitable to me.  It's a book fit for a babby, and I'm not a babby.  If you was to leave me a doll, I shouldn't nuss it.  How have I been conducting of myself?  Why, I've been drunk for three days; and I'da been drunk four if I'da had the money.  Don't I never mean for to go to church?  No, I don't never mean for to go to church.  I shouldn't be expected there, if I did; the beadle's too gen-teel for me.  And how did my wife get that black eye?  Why, I give it her; and if she says I didn't, she's a lie!"

He had pulled his pipe out of his mouth to say all this, and he now turned over on his other side and smoked again.  Mrs. Pardiggle, who had been regarding him through her spectacles with a forcible composure, calculated, I could not help thinking, to increase his antagonism, pulled out a good book as if it were a constable's staff and took the whole family into custody.  I mean into religious custody, of course; but she really did it as if she were an inexorable moral policeman carrying them all off to a station-house.