Charles Dickens, Bleak House: Ch. 52

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"Thank you, sir.  Howsoever," observed Mr. George with one of his sunburnt smiles, "a man who has been knocking about the world in a vagabond kind of a way as long as I have gets on well enough in a place like the present, so far as that goes."

"Next, as to your case," observed my guardian.

"Exactly so, sir," returned Mr. George, folding his arms upon his breast with perfect self-possession and a little curiosity.

"How does it stand now?"

"Why, sir, it is under remand at present.  Bucket gives me to understand that he will probably apply for a series of remands from time to time until the case is more complete.  How it is to be made more complete I don't myself see, but I dare say Bucket will manage it somehow."

"Why, heaven save us, man," exclaimed my guardian, surprised into his old oddity and vehemence, "you talk of yourself as if you were somebody else!"

"No offence, sir," said Mr. George.  "I am very sensible of your kindness.  But I don't see how an innocent man is to make up his mind to this kind of thing without knocking his head against the walls unless he takes it in that point of view.

"That is true enough to a certain extent," returned my guardian, softened.  "But my good fellow, even an innocent man must take ordinary precautions to defend himself."

"Certainly, sir.  And I have done so.  I have stated to the magistrates, 'Gentlemen, I am as innocent of this charge as yourselves; what has been stated against me in the way of facts is perfectly true; I know no more about it.'  I intend to continue stating that, sir.  What more can I do?  It's the truth."

"But the mere truth won't do," rejoined my guardian.

"Won't it indeed, sir?  Rather a bad look-out for me!" Mr. George good-humouredly observed.

"You must have a lawyer," pursued my guardian.  "We must engage a good one for you."

"I ask your pardon, sir," said Mr. George with a step backward.  "I am equally obliged.  But I must decidedly beg to be excused from anything of that sort."

"You won't have a lawyer?"

"No, sir."  Mr. George shook his head in the most emphatic manner.  "I thank you all the same, sir, but—no lawyer!"

"Why not?"

"I don't take kindly to the breed," said Mr. George.  "Gridley didn't.  And—if you'll excuse my saying so much—I should hardly have thought you did yourself, sir."

"That's equity," my guardian explained, a little at a loss; "that's equity, George."

"Is it, indeed, sir?" returned the trooper in his off-hand manner.  "I am not acquainted with those shades of names myself, but in a general way I object to the breed."

Unfolding his arms and changing his position, he stood with one massive hand upon the table and the other on his hip, as complete a picture of a man who was not to be moved from a fixed purpose as ever I saw.  It was in vain that we all three talked to him and endeavoured to persuade him; he listened with that gentleness which went so well with his bluff bearing, but was evidently no more shaken by our representations that his place of confinement was.