Charles Dickens, Bleak House: Ch. 5

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She had taken my hand, and leading me and Miss Jellyby away, beckoned Richard and Ada to come too.  I did not know how to excuse myself and looked to Richard for aid.  As he was half amused and half curious and all in doubt how to get rid of the old lady without offence, she continued to lead us away, and he and Ada continued to follow, our strange conductress informing us all the time, with much smiling condescension, that she lived close by.

It was quite true, as it soon appeared.  She lived so close by that we had not time to have done humouring her for a few moments before she was at home.  Slipping us out at a little side gate, the old lady stopped most unexpectedly in a narrow back street, part of some courts and lanes immediately outside the wall of the inn, and said, "This is my lodging.  Pray walk up!"

She had stopped at a shop over which was written "KROOK, RAG AND BOTTLE WAREHOUSE."  Also, in long thin letters, "KROOK, DEALER IN MARINE STORES."  In one part of the window was a picture of a red paper mill at which a cart was unloading a quantity of sacks of old rags.  In another was the inscription "BONES BOUGHT."  In another, "KITCHEN-STUFF BOUGHT."  In another, "OLD IRON BOUGHT."  In another, "WASTE-PAPER BOUGHT."  In another, "LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S WARDROBES BOUGHT."  Everything seemed to be bought and nothing to be sold there.  In all parts of the window were quantities of dirty bottles—blacking bottles, medicine bottles, ginger-beer and soda-water bottles, pickle bottles, wine bottles, ink bottles; I am reminded by mentioning the latter that the shop had in several little particulars the air of being in a legal neighbourhood and of being, as it were, a dirty hanger-on and disowned relation of the law.  There were a great many ink bottles.  There was a little tottering bench of shabby old volumes outside the door, labelled "Law Books, all at 9d."  Some of the inscriptions I have enumerated were written in law-hand, like the papers I had seen in Kenge and Carboy's office and the letters I had so long received from the firm.  Among them was one, in the same writing, having nothing to do with the business of the shop, but announcing that a respectable man aged forty-five wanted engrossing or copying to execute with neatness and dispatch: Address to Nemo, care of Mr. Krook, within.  There were several second-hand bags, blue and red, hanging up.  A little way within the shop-door lay heaps of old crackled parchment scrolls and discoloured and dog's-eared law-papers.  I could have fancied that all the rusty keys, of which there must have been hundreds huddled together as old iron, had once belonged to doors of rooms or strong chests in lawyers' offices.  The litter of rags tumbled partly into and partly out of a one-legged wooden scale, hanging without any counterpoise from a beam, might have been counsellors' bands and gowns torn up.  One had only to fancy, as Richard whispered to Ada and me while we all stood looking in, that yonder bones in a corner, piled together and picked very clean, were the bones of clients, to make the picture complete.

As it was still foggy and dark, and as the shop was blinded besides by the wall of Lincoln's Inn, intercepting the light within a couple of yards, we should not have seen so much but for a lighted lantern that an old man in spectacles and a hairy cap was carrying about in the shop.  Turning towards the door, he now caught sight of us.  He was short, cadaverous, and withered, with his head sunk sideways between his shoulders and the breath issuing in visible smoke from his mouth as if he were on fire within.  His throat, chin, and eyebrows were so frosted with white hairs and so gnarled with veins and puckered skin that he looked from his breast upward like some old root in a fall of snow.

"Hi, hi!" said the old man, coming to the door.  "Have you anything to sell?"

We naturally drew back and glanced at our conductress, who had been trying to open the house-door with a key she had taken from her pocket, and to whom Richard now said that as we had had the pleasure of seeing where she lived, we would leave her, being pressed for time.  But she was not to be so easily left.  She became so fantastically and pressingly earnest in her entreaties that we would walk up and see her apartment for an instant, and was so bent, in her harmless way, on leading me in, as part of the good omen she desired, that I (whatever the others might do) saw nothing for it but to comply.  I suppose we were all more or less curious; at any rate, when the old man added his persuasions to hers and said, "Aye, aye!  Please her!  It won't take a minute!  Come in, come in!  Come in through the shop if t'other door's out of order!" we all went in, stimulated by Richard's laughing encouragement and relying on his protection.